MAGGIE SUE'S DOGmatic BLOG


March 19:  In my mailbox I found the following question:

Dear Maggie Sue,
        Old question -- Is Sunday Lent?  I always consider it is and abstain on it as well.  I have a pecan pie slice, an ice cream cup  and a cupcake in my freezer from Meals-on-Wheels waiting for Easter.  Someone said that Sunday is not lent ...but it is a part of the 40 days, so how can it not be?

Perhaps an old but still a great question!! Technically, Lent begins Ash Wednesday and concludes Holy Thursday when the Mass of the Lord Supper begins.  However if you count those days, minus the Sundays is 38, but including Good Friday and Holy Saturday (which really are days of Penance within themselves) you get 40.  The number 40 is important as it parallels Jesus’ 40 days of fasting and prayer after his Baptism.  Technically we don’t count the Sundays during Lent because each Sunday IS a “mini-Easter” but, in essence, Sundays are STILL a part of Lent!!  Therefore if you want to relax your discipline during Lent it is rational to do so.  However “REAL” Catholics will embrace their discipline and maintain its graces ALL through the Lenten Season.  

FASTING AND ABSTINENCE FOR LENT
• Everyone 14 years of age or older is bound to abstain from meat on Ash Wednesday and all the Fridays in Lent.
• Everyone 18 years of age and under 59 years of age is bound to fast on Ash Wednesday and Good Friday.
• On these two days of fast and abstinence, only one full meatless meal is allowed. Two other meatless meals, sufficient to maintain strength, may be taken according to each one’s needs, but together they should not equal one full meal.
• Eating between meals is not permitted on these two days, but liquids, including milk and fruit juices, are allowed. When health or ability to work would be seriously affected, the law does not oblige.
• To disregard completely the law of fast and abstinence is a serious matter.



March 12:  So, as I was perusing through some of my Dad’s literature on his desk, I found this interesting article on how great lessons are learned from dogs!  Of course, even the squirrels know that dogs are tremendously smarter than average animals (even some people I think!!) Well, the article went like this:

A pastor once told his congregation “I learned a great lesson from a dog!”  He said “His master used to put a bit of meat or a biscuit on the ground and he’d say to the dog, ‘Don’t eat that,’ and the dog would run over and eat it, so he’d gently hit the dog and say ‘NO.’  And he put another piece of meat on the ground.  He’d say ‘Don’t eat that.’ The dog would go over and eat it, and he’d gently hit him again and say ‘NO.’ Well, after awhile, the dog got the message: eat meat, get hit.  So the dog decided he wouldn’t eat the meat.”  But the man telling the story related how that the dog never looked at the meat.  The dog evidently felt that if he looked at the meat, the temptation to disobey would be too great, and so he looked steadfastly into his master’s face and never took his eyes off him, and thus the temptation never caused a problem!!

I’m wondering if that dog was a Sheltie!!  But of course if it was, it wouldn’t have taken 3 times to learn!!  But the important lesson for everyone is to keep your eyes focused on your Master and you’ll have no problem falling into temptations and sin, you think?!!  Those squirrels sure did! ☺



March 5:  Our Lenten Journey begins this 1st Sunday of Lent with the penitent characteristics of Prayer, Fasting and Almsgiving.  I like Lent, but there’s one thing I really don’t like: fasting! I mean, we know that Alms, Prayers, and Fasting are important, but I really have a hard time giving up all those treats those ladies in the office give me.  And Ms Bell-Overholt, please don’t stop bringing crackers and cheese to morning Masses?!?!?

Did you know that during Lent everyone 14 years of age or older is bound to abstain from meat on Ash Wednesday and all the Fridays of Lent? And everyone 19 years of age and under 59 years of age is bound to fast on Ash Wednesday and Good Friday?  On these 2 days, only 1 full meal is allowed. Two other meatless meals may be taken according to one’s needs, but together they should not equal one full meal. AND eating between meals is not permitted, except liquids of course. My Dad says that when health or ability to work would be seriously affected, the law does not oblige.

To disregard completely the law of fast and abstinence is a serious matter - so, if I’m giving up treats for this Lent I hope all of you do as well. I just hope my Dad gives me some of his salmon on those Fridays of Lent. My vet says that salmon is good for my beautiful coat. I know it’s good for my Dad and all of you too.

So Fast, Fish and No Treats. That’s my Lenten motto! Ruff!!



February 26:   So Lent starts this week and there are so many squirrels wondering what to give up or what to do extra during this Lenten Season.  Well, I sat them down and shared with them 19 things they could do and to think about through this Lenten Season.  Perhaps you may benefit from them as well.  They are:

Fear: God is on my side. In Him I am more than a conqueror. (See Romans 98)

The need to please everyone: I can’t please everyone anyway. There is only one I need to strive to please.

Envy: I am blessed. My value is not found in my possessions, but in my relationship with my Heavenly Father.
Impatience: God’s timing is the perfect timing.

Sense of entitlement: The world does not owe me anything. God does not owe me anything. I live in humility and grace.

Bitterness and Resentment: The only person I am hurting by holding onto these is myself.

Blame: I am not going to pass the buck. I will take responsibility for my actions.

Gossip and Negativity: I will put the best construction on everything when it comes to other people. I will also minimize my contact with people who are negative and toxic and bring other people down.

Comparison: I have my own unique contribution to make and there is no one else like me.

Fear of failure: You don’t succeed without experiencing failure. Just make sure you fall forward.

A spirit of poverty: Believe with God that there is always more than enough and never a lack.

Feelings of unworthiness: You are fearfully and wonderfully made by your creator. (See Psalm 139)

Doubt: Believe God has a plan for you that is beyond anything you could imagine. The future is brighter than you could ever realize.

Self-pity: God comforts us in our sorrow so that we can comfort others with the comfort we ourselves have received from God.

Retirement: As long as you are still breathing, you are here for a reason. You have a purpose to influence others for Christ. That does not come to an end until the day we die.

Excuses: A wise man once said, if you need an excuse, any excuse will do.

Lack of counsel: Wise decisions are rarely made in a vacuum.

Pride: Blessed are the humble.

Worry: God is in control and worrying will not help.













































 
 

























   
    
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